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Choosing a Kit

 


How to Choose a First Aid Kit
 
With such a wide range of kits available, how do you choose?
 
The first thing to understand is that there is no wrong decision, unless it is for work purposes. No matter what kit you buy, you will have the basics for small accidents. You will have some bandages, dressings, tape, and antiseptic. You will also have an instruction leaflet in case you don’t know what to do. There are several questions you need to ask when selecting a kit:
 
Where am I going to use it?
 
What sort of container is best for me?
 
How much do I want to spend?
 
Will I have any special needs?
 
What are the regulations at work?
 
Do I know how to use it?
 
Where am I going to use it?
 
The most common choices are in the car, at home, on weekends away, in the car or caravan, especially for camping, on a boat, or carried on your person. Once you have decided this, you narrow the choices down to 3 or 4 for each type of use.
 
For example, if you are looking for a kit for home, you only have to choose from the small home kit, the basic domestic, domestic, or large domestic. Please See our online shop
 
What sort of container is best for me?
 
Containers range from very compact glove box kits all the way up to large wall mounted metal cabinets.
 
Very often this is a more important consideration than price. For many people, especially when buying for the car or camping, the sizes of the container, or its shape or rigidity are prime concerns. If you have the space, a larger box is usually a better idea because we all have our own collection of medicines and creams that will be added to the kit. A kit that starts out really full is hard to add to. Please See our online shop
 
How much do I want to spend?
 
This is a very important consideration. Many times, the other considerations above will lead you to a kit under your budget. If your budget does not stretch to what you have decided above, talk to us and we can work out the best compromise. It may be one of our standard kits less a few of the items, or a smaller one in a different container. Remember that a smaller kit is still better than none at all. Please See our online shop
 
Will I have any special needs?
 
Special needs could be living a long way from a doctor, planning on being on a 4WD holiday for a long period, being concerned about snake bites, having 6 kids and needing lots of supplies, taking a group of kids on holidays, or any one of a multitude of other things. Every kit can be customised for your specific situation. Ask us and we will work with you to meet your special needs. Please See our online shop
 
What are the regulations at work?
 
This sounds like a much more complicated question than it really is. Kits are graded around both the number of employees and the risk assessment of your work situation. For example an office is a much lower risk than a kitchen or warehouse. Please see our online shop and view the Industrial kit section where we have broken it down for you based on your states regulations. If you are still unsure our staff are more than happy to guide you through this decision making process. You can also view your state regulations. Please See our online shop - State Regulations
 
Do I know how to use it?
 
This is a very important question. In times when the first aid kit may need to be used it can be as little as a scratch that can be looked after with a bandaid or something much worse. Your first aid kit is also designed to assist you with bleeding, burns - thermal, chemical, friction, electrical, injuries: cold and crush injuries; eye and ear injuries; head, neck and spinal injuries, minor skin injuries; needle stick injuries; soft tissue injuries including sprains, strains, dislocations, as well as many other situations.
 
Unfortunately there are times that you need more than your first aid kit, they need more hands on approach as you may need to deal with CPR, abdominal injuries, allergic reactions, altered and loss of consciousness, cardiac arrest, casualty with no signs of life, chest pain, choking/airway obstruction, injuries: cold and crush injuries; eye and ear injuries; head, neck and spinal injuries; envenomation - snake, spider, insect and marine bites, environmental impact such as hypothermia, hyperthermia, dehydration, heat stroke, fractures, medical conditions, including cardiac conditions, epilepsy, diabetes, asthma and other respiratory distress, seizures, shock, stroke, substance misuse - common drugs and alcohol, including illicit drugs.
 
If you would like to know how to look after your family or a person in need then book into a course today. 1 DAY and only $125 can help you answer that question confidently. 
 
TGA approved – what does this mean and why is this good thing?
 
The Australian community expects that medicines and medical devices in the marketplace are safe and of high quality, and of a standard at least equal to that of comparable countries. The objective of the Therapeutic Goods Act 1989, which came into effect on 15 February 1991, is to provide a national framework for the regulation of therapeutic goods in Australia to ensure the quality, safety and efficacy of medicines and ensure the quality, safety and performance of medical devices.
 
 
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